We have now completed the third and fourth week of my internship. Classes are a little behind schedule due to the delays from Hurricane Irma. This has caused some issues and concerns from the students. A few major assignments have been pushed back to have overlapping due dates. I discovered the students in my Friday lab section, Web Design Workshop (DIG4014), are a smaller subset of the Monday lab section students, Media for eCommerce (DIG4530). Unfortunately, both of these lab sections have large writing assignments due within just a few days of each other. Originally the assignments did not overlap, and there was ample time for the students to work on the assignment and receive feedback. Due to the storms, that work window shrank significantly. This week they ended up having about 20 pages due between the two courses. In addition to the writing, they were required to create and setup a five page website.

On the instructor side of things, I also realize a lot of the students likely had more time to work on the project than originally planned. Most students evacuated and were in safe places with power/internet for the duration of the storm. While it sounds kind of crazy with today’s standards, they could have resorted to handwriting a few drafts of their paper if they lost power. In most areas power was restored within just a few days, so they didn’t lose the entire week of time. If the students were proactive, they could have been ahead and done with the assignment. A few of them implied this was the case during the previous week, that they felt ahead of where they needed to be. That confidence for the most part was lost this week, as many expressed some dismay at the amount of work still ahead of them.

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I am enrolled in an internship course, ENG6947, this semester at the University of Central Florida (UCF). As a part of that internship I am currently tasked with teaching two different lab components for two similar courses. I am helping with Web Design Workshop (DIG4014) and Media for eCommerce (DIG4530). Both courses are part of the Digital Media (DM) program under the School of Visual Arts & Design (SVAD) at UCF.

In Web Design Workshop the students will be looking at various websites to find one that needs a redesign. Their project will be working on recreating the site using modern technologies. They will not actually replace the current site they choose to work on, but simply create the redesign as part of their portfolio. For eCommerce students will choose a business sector and design a ecommerce website for that business. The goal is to have a fully functioning website created from scratch using modern technologies that the students will use after graduating.

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Formatting microSD Card for BerryBoot

Formatting microSD Card for BerryBoot

This post is to help people properly format their microSD cards for BerryBoot for the Raspberry Pi. Large microSD cards will not always have the option to format as FAT or FAT32 in Windows. In my case, I was using a Sony 128 gigabyte microSD card. Following these steps you can format 100 megabytes of space as a FAT32 partition. Once the process is complete, you will be able to copy over the necessary BerryBoot files for setup.

  1. Hit Windows Key + X, and choose Command Prompt (Admin)
    • This should work for Windows 8 and Windows 10.
    • Alternatively, you can search for Command Prompt, right click on it, and choose “Run as Administrator”.
  2. Type “diskpart”
  3. Type “list disk”
  4. Find your USB drive, and determine the Disk #.
    • Remember they start at 0, which should be your C drive.
    • In my case, Disk 0 was my secondary drive, Disk 1 was my operating system drive, and Disk 2 was the microSD card.
  5. Let’s assume “Disk 1” is your USB.
  6. Now type “select disk 1”
  7. Then type “clean”
  8. Followed by “create partition primary size=100”
    • “size=100” makes the partition 100 megabytes in size. BerryBoot does not need more space than that.
    • You can skip “size=100” if you have a small card, but otherwise you will waste time while formatting the partition.
  9. Lastly type “format fs=fat32”
    • You can replace fat32 with a different type.
    • You can add “quick”, if you would like to do a quick format. This is only advisable if the partition is a few gigabytes in size.
  10. You can now type “active” to make the drive active. Then “assign” to give the drive a letter assignment.
  11. Now type “exit”, and your drive should be fully accessible again.

To the right you will see an image of the process as I executed it on my computer. The last two commands “assign” and “exit” are not shown.